Testimonials


Braden Bolton

Braden Bolton

Graduated August 2015
Linguistics Major
Epic Systems Corporation

What is your current job like?
Currently I work as a technical support analyst. I am a specialist for a part of the software we sell and help solve problems for those who purchase our software. I often look at code, at files customers build, etc.

How did you find out about Localization?
I discovered localization by word of mouth. The College of Humanities had sponsored some localization events and I became very interested in the industry. What attracted me to Localization was the overall linguistic nerdiness and a love for the finite nuances of languages.

What did you like most about the BYU Localization Club?
My favorite part of the BYU Localization Club was the camaraderie between all the members. I loved being able to nerd out about languages and having other people feel the same way. I think that my experiences in the club helped me realize that the world is becoming more technically focused, so I started marketing my technical aptitudes and quirky linguistic eccentricities to employers.

Any advice for those interested in Localization?
If you’re interested in a career that deals with languages in any way, get in touch with someone from the industry. If you aren’t sure how you can use your skills, talk to someone who does know. You can get an idea of what you can do/what you’d be good at just by having a conversation with someone already in the Localization industry.



Dylan Parkinson

Dylan Parkinson

Graduates April 2016
Spanish Translation Major
Currently Employed at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

What is your current job like?
The Church’s thousands of translation projects all come through our office. We handle due dates and are responsible for getting the source text to the right translators. We coordinate those projects to in-house translation teams as well as outsourcing to local translation companies.

How did you find out about Localization?

I was first introduced to Localization through my academic advisor. However, the club and related classes helped me gain a better understanding of what Localization is and why it is relevant. Localization bridges the gap between cultures one language at a time. Also, the people I have met in the industry are the type of people I enjoy being around and especially working with or for.

What did you like most about the BYU Localization Club?
The BYU Localization Club introduced me to an industry that I had no idea even existed until last year. Fortunately for me, I fell in love with that industry. I was able to get to know my current boss through multiple club events that he attended.

Any advice for those interested in Localization?
The club is what you make of it. The important part is getting involved by taking classes, volunteering for club events, and attending LocLand (the club’s internship/career fair and networking event). The industry is booming, so hop on the localization train and get a job!



Casey Garland

Casey Garland

Graduated April 2015
French Studies Major
Xactware Solutions, Inc.

What is your current job like?
I manage the translation process of my company’s documentation. My team sends me pages they’ve written and need translated into French, Dutch, German, and Spanish, which I forward to a third-party translation company with a deadline request. When those translations come back, I forward them on to our in-house reviewers with another deadline. I keep the French documentation and review it myself. If the English document is short enough, I also do the translation work. When the reviewed translations come back, I send them back to my teammates for implementation and publishing. When I don’t have projects to manage, I review and edit the translated websites, applications, existing documentation, and play a lot of ping-pong!

How did you find out about Localization?
Initially, my advisor told me about the BYU Localization Club and the localization industry as we discussed my options for post-graduation. After getting involved, I love literally everything about it! Localization blends three of my favorite things: people, technology, and languages. Every day I’m immersed in a fast-paced environment with a high learning curve, and there’s always something new to learn!

What did you like most about the BYU Localization Club?
My favorite part of the BYU Localization Club was networking and getting hands-on experience with the different tools used by localizers. A BYU alumni at my current company reached out to the Humanities Advisement Center, seeking a French-speaker. My advisor forwarded the job posting to me and I applied, interviewed, and was hired. BUT! There was so much more that went on behind the scenes. At the club, I was introduced to many people who helped me discover a set of skills that I didn’t know I had, and had a knack for! Through my months of attendance, I gained real-world knowledge and experience that allowed me to build an impressive resume, knock my interview out of the park (localize that!), and land my first big-boy job.

Any advice for those interested in Localization?
ATTENTION LANGUAGE-LOVING MILLENIALS – Localization is for YOU! This is honestly one of the most secure jobs in the market right now. As the Internet has effectively taken over the world, it has become much easier for companies to expand their horizons. There are tons of software companies who are going global, especially in Utah (there’s a reason they call Salt Lake County the “Silicone Slopes!”), and they need your help! If you’re interested in an incredible starting salary for a super secure entry-level job with amazing benefits and a wonderful environment – BYU’s L10N club will get you there.



Brent Summers

Brent Summers

Graduates April 2017
Spanish Translation Major, Localization Minor, Global Business & Literacy Minor
Currently Employed at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

What is your current job like?
My job is extremely involved in the translation process. I am the middleman between the Producers (translation project managers) of the church, and the translation offices across the world. I am given a scope for a translation project from a producer, I run the documents through some processes to get a word count, run it through machine translation engines if requested, and get a “Scoping Report” (with detailed word count) that I use to create a translation project in SDL WorldServer. After I create a project in WorldServer we create a translation schedule for the translators. We want the project to make deadlines, but we also want to make sure that the translators have enough time to translate, review and revise the documents. Depending upon the type of translation, we also might need to allot time for the WebQC (Quality Check) team look at the translation to makes sure it looks good on a webpage.

How did you find out about Localization?
I was introduced into localization through a family friend. I got to know what he does for Mozilla, which first peaked my interest. He and I went to lunch one day and discussed what he does for Mozilla and what he studied during his undergraduate (Spanish Translation). This interested me enough to look into the program. After meeting a translation professor, I realized that everything that I’d learned in my five areas of interest could all be combined into one great degree/career.

What did you like most about the BYU Localization Club?
My favorite part of my involvement with the BYU Localization Club has been the networking events. The head engineer of Disney Interactive was the keynote speaker at one of these conferences. I was also able to network with many translation/localization professionals from a lot of Utah and California based companies at these events. These opportunities allowed me to meet my future boss, and eventually apply for the job that I currently have with the LDS Church.

Any advice for those interested in Localization?
My biggest counsel would be, find what part of the l10n/g11n/i18n process that you are truly interested in and learn everything you can about it. You don’t have to know everything, but if you know a lot about a few things you will always have a good job. I have come to realize that I don’t want to be a translator for the rest of my life, but I understand that having a strong knowledge in translation will help me in the things that I am interested in. The knowledge of how hard and long it takes to translate documents has directly helped me in my current job. I’m learning great project management skills at my current job that I can apply in my future career. Learning the essential skills in school is key to getting the job that will get you your dream job.